In 2004, following the directions in an ancient sutra, we cross the most remote Ngari region of western Tibet searching for Shambhala (Shangri-la). The expedition can be understood on three levels. First, the original Shambhala Sutra describes places that can be found in western Tibet, considered by many Hindus and Jains as the location of Shambhala. Second, the journey is actually not physical but metaphysical, a wandering into our own subconscious through meditation and self-realization. Third, the Shambhala Sutra predicts our current “Age of Kali” when war, cyclical poverty and environmental degradation lead to humanity’s own self-destruction. It teaches us we can change these things at any time. But that depends on understanding the problem and having an intention to take action and do something about it. That begins with realization on many levels at once.bhala Sutra describes places that can be found in western Tibet, considered by many Hindus and Jains as the location of Shambhala. Second, the journey is actually not physical but metaphysical, a wandering into our own subconscious through meditation and self-realization. Third, the Shambhala Sutra predicts our current “Age of Kali” when war, cyclical poverty and environmental degradation lead to humanity’s own self-destruction. It teaches us we can change these things at any time. But that depends on understanding the problem and having an intention to take action and do something about it. That begins with realization on many levels at once.bhala Sutra describes places that can be found in western Tibet, considered by many Hindus and Jains as the location of Shambhala. Second, the journey is actually not physical but metaphysical, a wandering into our own subconscious through meditation and self-realization. Third, the Shambhala Sutra predicts our current “Age of Kali” when war, cyclical poverty and environmental degradation lead to humanity’s own self-destruction. It teaches us we can change these things at any time. But that depends on understanding the problem and having an intention to take action and do something about it. That begins with realization on many levels at once.bhala Sutra describes places that can be found in western Tibet, considered by many Hindus and Jains as the location of Shambhala. Second, the journey is actually not physical but metaphysical, a wandering into our own subconscious through meditation and self-realization. Third, the Shambhala Sutra predicts our current “Age of Kali” when war, cyclical poverty and environmental degradation lead to humanity’s own self-destruction. It teaches us we can change these things at any time. But that depends on understanding the problem and having an intention to take action and do something about it. That begins with realization on many levels at once.